Melink
_X4A9257

Suncorp Pitt Street Mall | Sydney

Melink
Geyer-Hospitality-design-consultants-Singapore-Cathay-Pacific-Airport-Lounge-interior-12.jpg

Cathay Pacific | Singapore

Melink
Interior-Office-Design-Perth-Westpac-Geyer-40

Westpac | Perth

Melink
Geyer design firm singapore Toll interior 4

Toll City | Singapore

Melink

Brookfield | Perth

Melink
Geyer-interior-design-King-Wood-Mallesons-perth-banner-2.jpg

KWM | Perth

Melink

Westpac | Melbourne

Melink
Telstra-Icon-Store-Sydney-Geyer-design-banner-1280.jpg

Telstra Icon | Sydney

Melink
Geyer-Westpak-Barangaroo-banner-1280-1.jpg

Westpac | Sydney

Melink
Geyer-Suncorp-Sandbox-banner-1280.jpg

Suncorp Concept | Sydney

Melink
Geyer-Curtin-connect-banner-1280.jpg

Curtin | Perth

Melink

Telstra Discovery | Melbourne

Melink
Geyer-Bank-of-Melbourne-banner-1280.jpg

Bank of Melbourne | Melbourne

Melink
Geyer-Heinemann-SydneyAirport-1-banner-1280.jpg

Heinemann | Sydney

Melink
Geyer-Sephora-banner-1280.jpg

Sephora | Sydney

Melink
Geyer-Tesla-Sydney-banner-1280.jpg

Tesla | Sydney

Melink
Geyer-Cochlear-banner-1280.jpg

Cochlear HQ | Sydney

Melink
Geyer-University-of-Newcastle-Learning-space-banner-1280.jpg

Social Science | UoN

Melink
Geyer-University-of-Newcastle-Sydney-Presence-banner-1280.jpg

Sydney Presence | UoN

Melink
Geyer-Auchmuty-Library-banner-1280-1.jpg

Auchmuty Library | UoN

Melink
Geyer-University-of-Sydney-Badam-Library-banner-1280.jpg

Upgrade Program | UoS

Melink
Geyer-University-of-Sydney-Student-Administration-Services-banner-1280.jpg

Student Admin Services | UoS

Melink
Geyer-Moore-Theological-College-banner-1280.jpg

Moore College | Sydney

Melink
Geyer-Rabobank-sydney-banner-1280.jpg

Rabobank | Sydney

Melink
JWT-geyer-sydney-banner-1280.jpg

JWT | Sydney

Melink
HBF Headquarters-banner-1280.jpg

HBF HQ | Perth

Melink
Geyer-Singapore-CapitaLand-banner-1280.jpg

CapitaLand | Singapore

Melink
Geyer-Barrick-Gold-18_banner-1280.jpg

Barrick Gold | Perth

Melink
Geyer-BHP-Billiton-melbourne-HQ-banner-1280.jpg

BHP Billiton | Melbourne

Melink
Geyer-Squire-Sanders-banner.jpg

Squire Sanders | Perth

Melink
Geyer-Qantas-lounge-brisbane-Reception-banner-1280.jpg

Qantas Lounge | Brisbane

Melink

Di Bella | Perth

Melink

Next Hotel | Brisbane

Melink
Geyer-Venn-banner-1280.jpg

Venn | Perth

Melink
Geyer-The-Pier-banner-1280.jpg

The Pier | Melbourne

Melink
Geyer-interior-design-firm singapore-American-Express-corporate-office-9.jpg

American Express | Singapore

The numbers tell
the story...

BILLIONS WORTH OF CONSTRUCTION

Evolution.
At work.

RE-DEFINED. RE-IMAGINED. RE-INVENTED.

Making space for others creates
a service-oriented mindset.

THE SELFLESS ART OF HOSPITALITY

Knowledge. No commodity is more
valued on campus.

A SPACE TO LEARN

It's theatre. It's discovery.
It's a gift.

WE LOVE OUR RETAIL THERAPY

Who is Geyer?

100+ TALENTED PEOPLE. PLUS ONE.

To create with curiosity
intelligence & spirit

IMPROVE THE HUMAN EXPERIENCE

Generations of
design

CELEBRATE OUR PAST AND EMBRACE THE FUTURE

5 studios across
Asia Pacific

ONE VISION

The one thing
that can't be designed...

TRUST.

Awards remind us
others are watching

WE'LL SHOW THEM OFF. WE'RE ONLY HUMAN

Love what you do.

GROW WITH US v>

Your future
is in your hands

USE THEM

Get a head start
in the industry

LEARN ON INTERNATIONAL PROJECTS

Michael Bleby for The Australian Financial Review.

Telstra consumer boss Karsten Wildberger knows a lot about retail. But a discussion with designers Geyer about the telco’s planned Melbourne store made him see it differently. “They compared the shop floor – and it was quite different from what you would normally think – to a dance floor,” Wildberger says. “It was the arrangement of the furniture, how they moved. When you talk about retail as a dance floor, what would it mean for the arrangement and furniture? That was a very interesting conversation.”

That conversation led to a change in design for the 101 square metre store Telstra opened a year ago. The look was more open. Gone were the big counters separating staff from customers. Device-toting employees were free to walk around with their customers, talking and showing them things.

Telstra-melboune-retail-design-5.jpg

Allowing staff and customers to dance their natural dance worked.

Telstra doesn’t disclose sales but says they rose immediately. Its national Net Promoter Score, a measure of customers’ willingness to recommend the store, was among Telstra’s highest.

The results echo those of Bank of Queensland, which found overall sales doubled at two branches it redesigned to promote interaction between staff and customers. These are lessons Telstra has taken to heart ahead of Monday’s opening of 400 George Street, the flagship store in its largest metropolitan market. The country’s largest telco, like traditional bricks-and-mortar retailers the world over, is learning that to survive in a digital age, retail has to offer an experience that nothing else can replicate.

Telstra-melboune-retail-design-1.jpg

Far from a matter of simple aesthetics, design – in the way it can encourage or prevent that experience – is playing a greater role in that than ever before.

“Great design impacts the way people use space and experience space and experience other people within those spaces,” says Robyn Lindsey, a partner at Geyer who consulted on the Melbourne and Sydney stores. “The biggest lesson is allowing the team member, employee and customer to be highly mobile, to be free and mobile, which doesn’t happen in a lot of product stores.”

Telstra-melboune-retail-design-3.jpgA range of poses.

With the traditional counter gone, smaller tables and other spaces came in, to permit discussions in a range of poses. A customer in a hurry to pay a bill might be keen to stand, for example, while one wanting to discuss new handsets would likely sit. Then again, if a customer paying a bill happened to ask about handsets, the employee could immediately walk them over to where kit was displayed to discuss them.

There were costs, of course. It requires more training of staff and in some stores, more staff, Wildberger says. “We invest more in people and in the quality of people and our training, for sure. In some locations because we have a very high demand. We invest based on wait times and providing that experience – and that’s well invested.” And the innovations didn’t always work. After taking out the big counter, Telstra had to put back something for customers who were lost without a central reference point.

“Customers would come into Melbourne Central and be not quite sure where to go to,” Lindsey says. “So eventually . . . we brought back a go-to point, which started to make them comfortable.”

It wasn’t the full-sized counter, but a smaller “pod”, that provides customers who are unsure with somewhere to go. That, too, will be phased out eventually.

Telstra-melboune-retail-design-4.jpg

“Over the passage of time there’ll be no need for a go-to point,” she says.

With 462 square metres of space, Telstra’s new Sydney store, on George Street opposite the Apple store, is four times larger than Melbourne Central’s, but it will also have more front-of-house space than an equivalent traditional retailer.

Product storage has been brought front-of-house. It means customers don’t break their interaction with a staff member who disappears out the back, Lindsey says. “What could be three minutes could seem like it’s five minutes and the customer would get impatient,” she says. “By bringing it all front-of-house, it meant that the staff member never lost sight of the customer and vice versa.”

In Sydney, the design won’t completely mimic Melbourne – the Victorian store has too much wood in its decor, for one thing – but better engagement of staff with customers is just as important.

As Wildberger says, “The idea of being a bit more playful, taking the customer on a journey around the dance floor will be the same.”

  • InDesign Live: 5 minutes with  Wendy Geitz

    Media articles